East Algarve
Portugal's West side has enjoyed the lion's share of the Tourist trade since the 1970's however the East side, stretching from the Central City of Faro to the far Spanish border, is far more traditional, relaxing and infinitely more adventurous...

There is no shortage of high quality beaches either. Sand stretches as far as the eye can see, with virtually deserted islands marking the boundary between the famous protected Ria Formosa and the sea.  The ocean, in every shade of turquoise blue invites you for long swims, splashing in the waves with the kids and indulging in the many water sports on offer from Paddle-boarding to Surfing, Kite-boarding to inflatable water parks.
The Ria Formosa Natural Park  is an area protected by Natural Park status since 1987 and was elected in 2010 as one of the 7 Natural Wonders of Portugal. It covers an area of about 18,400 hectares, distributed along 60 km of unspoilt coastline as a wetland of international importance and recognised as a special protection zone. With about two hundred species documented, the Ria Formosa hosts migratory birds coming from central and northern Europe whilst also being a breeding ground for many others as a recognised ecosystem of great importance not only regionally, but at national and international levels.
There are many towns and villages quaintly positioned along the east algarve coast, but also many residential options in the Serra do Caldeirao mountain area’s. 

 
Tavira
Tavira is an ancient Moorish town that has retained its unique character and heritage to become one of the finest resort towns of the Algarve. The town extends along the banks of the Gilão River and is a delightful mix of traditional Portuguese architecture with deep-rooted Moorish influences. It is a joy to explore with its plethora of historic buildings and decorative churches, all of which are set around charming plazas and pretty cobbled streets.
 
Tavira is a great destination for a beach holiday as to the south of the town are the pristine beaches of the Ilha de Tavira. These secluded beaches can stretch for many kilometres with no one in sight, they are some of the least developed of the Algarve, being protected by the Ria Formosa Nature Park. Easy to access through a variety of transport means; car, ferry, speed boat or train making a day at the beach an exciting adventure…Tavira is a mature and unhurried destination, which is ideal for those who wants to experience local culture, traditions and cuisine. Tavira is more than suitable for families and still within reach of the popular family water-parks and theme-parks, which are situated in the central Algarve region.
 
Tavira evenings can be spent enjoying local alfresco dining in the charming historic centre, split between the river Gilao whilst eating traditional Portuguese dishes such as delicious freshly caught fish and socialising over a bottle of locally produced wine.
 
Tavira’s relaxed and unhurried ambience makes it a great location for families or more mature visitors seeking a calm holiday destination. For the more active visitor, there are numerous cycling paths, long hiking routes, excellent golf courses and kilometres of waterways waiting to be discovered by kayak. With an immersion in Portuguese culture, this Century-old town – with it’s winding narrow walkways, whitewashed markets and village square cafés – are beyond quaint. The town boasts remnants of the Moors era, including a castle, the ancient city walls and mosques that were converted into more than 36 beautiful churches, ranging from Gothic to Renaissance, and from ornately painted to fully adorned in exquisite mosaic tiles. Local festivals and markets are exhibited most weekends throughout the peak season creating a traditional cultural feel to the town that celebrates Portuguese life. Delicious gelato ice cream shops are around every corner as are traditional bakeries with the East Algarve’s own unique recipe for the traditional pastel de nata (egg-custard tart). 
 
Around Tavira, there are also many other local villages well worth exploring.
 
Olhao
Olhão is the largest fishing port in the Algarve. 10km from Faro, Olhao is full of character with Moorish-style houses habited by the local small fishing settlement of a handful of people. Olhão from the fishing port side is, very industrial and doesn't look very attractive. However, along the waterfront,  there is a long, pleasant, paved promenade with pretty gardens that offer a pretty escape to the heat of the summer sun. Olhão is well known for it's fish market and in particular the numerous local cafes  serving the freshly caught wares along the roadside nearby -we guarantee you won't be disappointed!
 
The market halls are surrounded by pavement cafes and it is an unspoilt cultural  place to sit and enjoy the view of the boats moored along the waterfront in Olhão Marina and the gorgeous sand spit beach Ilhas of Armona and Culatra just a short distance offshore behind them.
 
Fuseta
Around 20km east of Faro,  the traditional fishing town of Fuzeta is one of the Algarve’s least “discovered” resorts. It is not the region’s most beautiful town, but it does retain some character as a working fishing port where the daily routine revolves around its fishermen, whose colourful boats line up alongside the river in town whilst they head to the line of lively kiosk-cafés spreading  from the ferry stop towards the river beach.
 
The waterfront of modern shops and apartments faces broad gardens tand a busy summer campsite. Beyond this is the estuary beach and beyond that a beautiful stretch of white sand over the lagoon on the Ilha da Armona. This beach more than makes up for the Industrial - style town as a secret jewel on the unspoilt eastern coast.
 
Santa Luzia
The small octopus fishing village of Santa Luzia, where traditional methods are still used to catch the octopus and freshly cooked to perfection in the harbour front restaurants. Santa Luzia overlooks the lagoons and waterways of the Ria Formosa Natural Park, which is a haven for migratory birds and small marine life.Santa Luzia is a traditional Portuguese fishing village, which remains authentic and untouched by the influences of tourism. The colourful fishing boats return early in the morning and this is the best time to visit the fish market, where the last night’s catch is displayed and sold. On the seaward side of Ria Formosa are some of the quietest beaches of the Algarve and these pristine beaches can be reached by small ferries that depart from the harbour.
 
Santa Luzia also boasts the Praia do Barril beach - which was the setting for the strangest memorial of the Algarve, the Anchor Cemetery, dedicated to the fisherman that lived there.
 
Cabanas de Tavira
Cabanas de Tavira is a former fishing village, about 7km east from Tavira. The history of Cabanas goes back to the year of 1734, at the same time the tuna fish fishing activity started, originating a need for the creation of huts (cabanas is the Portuguese word for huts) to store all the fishing tools and the growth of the community.
 
This parish still lives mainly from fishing, contributing to the enrichment of the local gastronomy with daily, fresh products such as tuna fish, razor clams, oysters etc. Although the strong connection and dependence derives from fishing, Cabanas also appeals to the visiting tourist, where the village sits alongside a long line of low-rise houses, shops, bars and restaurants facing the picturesque Ria Formosa Nature Park.
 
Vila Nova de Cacela:
 
Vila Nova de Cacela is in fact two towns; Cacela Velha - 'old' Cacela - and Vila Nova de Cacela - 'new' Cacela:
 
1. Cacela Velha
Cacela Velha is a quaint Portuguese village located in the civil parish of Vila Nova de Cacela, municipality of Vila Real de Santo António. Cacela Velha is situated on top of a hill with a view to the easternmost lagoon of the Ria Formosa. Cacela Velha was once open to the sea, with the mouth of the Pedra Alva river making a small harbour. During the 7th - 13th centuries, defensive ramparts were built and Cacela Velha was the first point in the Algarve conquered by the knights of the Order  in 1240.
 
For many years, commercial fishing has been the main source of commerce for Cacela Velha, but in recent years, the village has been visited as a picturesque tourist destination. Situated 10km east of Cabanas, the whitewashed village is a reminder of how the Algarve would have looked half a century ago. Apart from a few café-restaurants, there are few tourist facilities, a pretty church and the remains of an eighteenth-century fort that houses a maritime police station. Cacela Velha’s beachfront location and lack of modern overdevelopment is attractive to many visitors, whilst the village's fishing fleets continue to supply the local seafood restaurants with oysters, clams, prawns and baby squid. Golfers will be delighted by the 36 holes of Quinta da Ria and Quinta da Cima golf courses; great golf and beautiful courses with sea views and olive-lined fairways.
 
2. Nova de Cacela
Cacela Velha Vila Nova de Cacela is a small town which has all the basic amenities including a newly built town market. However, the town's one claim to fame is its street market, held on the 3rd Sunday of every month, which fills the entire town and temporarily doubles the population. It is a 26 km trip from Faro airport nestling on the edge of the stunning Serra do Caldeirão mountains where a breathtaking view of the long stretches of golden beaches can be appreciated - Fabrica and Manta Rota beaches are minutes away. The jewel in the crown for this village though is Eastern Algarve's exclusive Monte Rei Golf & Country Club. This golfing paradise features the award-winning Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course, set in a private estate spanning over 1,000 acres of unspoilt countryside with dramatic views of the neighbouring mountains and Atlantic ocean.
 
Manta Rota
Manta Rota is a small seaside town in the civil parish of Vila Nova de Cacela, municipality of Vila Real de Santo António. The town boasts traditional bars, cafes and well-appointed restaurants selling traditional Portuguese plates that will tempt you after a hard day relaxing on the amazing golden sands beach. The beach at Manta Rota sits on the edge of the Ria Formosa Natural Park and is part of the long sweep of fine sand that arches from the frontier town of Vila Real de Santo António, on the Spanish border, to Praia de Cabanas in Tavira. The beach is backed by low sand dunes which seem to go on forever, and it is often said the sea temperature at Manta Rosa is warmer than much of the Algarve. This is partly due to the shallow slope of the beach which not only keeps the water warmer but makes it perfect for paddling - a great family beach with plenty of facilities.It should be noted however, that this beach is very popular in the hot summer months.
 
Altura
Altura is situated 50 minutes away from Faro airport and just 6 miles from the Spanish border. A 20 minute drive from Tavira takes you to the laid-back feel of Altura which is reflected in the way of life here, from the delights of the daily market to the hospitality of the local population. If you are seeking peace and tranquillity in beautiful surroundings Altura is a perfect bustling village location with a wide choice of restaurants, bars and cafes that will leave a lasting impression. The Algarve is big on watersports, and Altura holidays are no exception, with windsurfing, snorkelling, scuba diving, jet-skiing and water-skiing on offer at the local beach.
 
Monte Gordo
Monte Gordo has been transformed from a minor fishing village into a modern and popular resort town. 
 
During the summer months, Monte Gordo has a buzzing atmosphere, attracting a wide selection of nationalities, including many Portuguese, who adore this part of the algarve region. In the town, there is a diverse selection of restaurants catering for every cuisine and taste, while the nightlife is relaxed and social, focused around late-night bars and restaurants. This town is ideal for, families with younger children as the beach this far down the coast is one of the safest of the Algarve, with small waves and no strong currents. Visitors can enjoy a great day on the glorious relaxing beach - although watersports are still available for the more adventurous - followed by a calm but touristic  town atmosphere to top off a perfect day.
 
Vila Real de Santo Antonio
Vila Real de Santo Antonio is a pretty 18th century Portuguese border town where the ferry crosses the Guadiana river from here to Ayamonte, Spain., There is also a modern road bridge just north of the town which allows road transport the easy and main access point to Spain. Vila Real boasts a central grid of streets that radiate out from an orange-grove lined main square, with low white buildings and pleasant outdoor cafés, bars and restaurants. The square is named Praça Marquês de Pombal after the king’s minister, who helped rebuild the original town after it was destroyed in a tsunami following the 1755 earthquake.
 
The town’s former market building is now used as a space for temporary exhibits and films which also dispenses tourist information. The streets surrounding the main square  are bustling with linen shops, clothing, jewelry and local crafts, while the riverside gardens offer fine views of the Marina and across the ocean to the white buildings of the neighbouring village - Ayamonte in Spain.
 
Castro Marim
Castro Marim has, historically, been an important town because of its position near the banks of the Guadiana and its proximity to the coast. The remains of the first settlements in the area date from about 5000 BC and for thousands of years it was a port that offered shelter to the ships that sailed the Guadiana river collecting wares from the Portuguese town Alcoutim.The town has also been important strategic in the defence of the Algarve - during the 14th century the soldiers of the 'Order of Christ,' who replaced the Knights Templar, had their headquarters in Castro Marim. The remains of the castle in Castro Marim, (which dates from 10th to 12th century), stand on one hill overlooking the town and the Fort of São Sebastião on the opposite hill, with the quaint houses of the town in between. From the castle you can get a great view of the river, the salt plains of the formosa and the ocean in the distance.
 
Castro Marim is a town of typically Portuguese houses, wide streets and a lot of the area around is quite flat, making it ideal for bike rides or walks. It appears a very 'laid back' town with no hustle and bustle, just people going about their daily tasks and stopping to take an occasional break at one of the local cafés.The relaxing way of Portuguese life still radiates here today and it is still possible to see some of the traditional crafts such as lace making and basket weaving in this area of the Algarve. There is little tourism here but a familiar sense of Portuguese belonging for passing visitors and new residents that are warmly welcomed into a warm, humble community.
 
Eastern Algarve Golf Courses:
* Benamor Golf Course
* Colina Verde
* Quinta da Ria
* Quinta de Cima
* Monte Rei   (Jack Nicklaus Course)
* Castro Marim
* Quinta do Vale  (Seve Ballesteros Course)
East Algarve
Portugal's West side has enjoyed the lion's share of the Tourist trade since the 1970's however the East side, stretching from the Central City of Faro to the far Spanish border, is far more traditional, relaxing and infinitely more adventurous...

There is no shortage of high quality beaches either. Sand stretches as far as the eye can see, with virtually deserted islands marking the boundary between the famous protected Ria Formosa and the sea.  The ocean, in every shade of turquoise blue invites you for long swims, splashing in the waves with the kids and indulging in the many water sports on offer from Paddle-boarding to Surfing, Kite-boarding to inflatable water parks.
The Ria Formosa Natural Park  is an area protected by Natural Park status since 1987 and was elected in 2010 as one of the 7 Natural Wonders of Portugal. It covers an area of about 18,400 hectares, distributed along 60 km of unspoilt coastline as a wetland of international importance and recognised as a special protection zone. With about two hundred species documented, the Ria Formosa hosts migratory birds coming from central and northern Europe whilst also being a breeding ground for many others as a recognised ecosystem of great importance not only regionally, but at national and international levels.
There are many towns and villages quaintly positioned along the east algarve coast, but also many residential options in the Serra do Caldeirao mountain area’s. 

 
Tavira
Tavira is an ancient Moorish town that has retained its unique character and heritage to become one of the finest resort towns of the Algarve. The town extends along the banks of the Gilão River and is a delightful mix of traditional Portuguese architecture with deep-rooted Moorish influences. It is a joy to explore with its plethora of historic buildings and decorative churches, all of which are set around charming plazas and pretty cobbled streets.
 
Tavira is a great destination for a beach holiday as to the south of the town are the pristine beaches of the Ilha de Tavira. These secluded beaches can stretch for many kilometres with no one in sight, they are some of the least developed of the Algarve, being protected by the Ria Formosa Nature Park. Easy to access through a variety of transport means; car, ferry, speed boat or train making a day at the beach an exciting adventure…Tavira is a mature and unhurried destination, which is ideal for those who wants to experience local culture, traditions and cuisine. Tavira is more than suitable for families and still within reach of the popular family water-parks and theme-parks, which are situated in the central Algarve region.
 
Tavira evenings can be spent enjoying local alfresco dining in the charming historic centre, split between the river Gilao whilst eating traditional Portuguese dishes such as delicious freshly caught fish and socialising over a bottle of locally produced wine.
 
Tavira’s relaxed and unhurried ambience makes it a great location for families or more mature visitors seeking a calm holiday destination. For the more active visitor, there are numerous cycling paths, long hiking routes, excellent golf courses and kilometres of waterways waiting to be discovered by kayak. With an immersion in Portuguese culture, this Century-old town – with it’s winding narrow walkways, whitewashed markets and village square cafés – are beyond quaint. The town boasts remnants of the Moors era, including a castle, the ancient city walls and mosques that were converted into more than 36 beautiful churches, ranging from Gothic to Renaissance, and from ornately painted to fully adorned in exquisite mosaic tiles. Local festivals and markets are exhibited most weekends throughout the peak season creating a traditional cultural feel to the town that celebrates Portuguese life. Delicious gelato ice cream shops are around every corner as are traditional bakeries with the East Algarve’s own unique recipe for the traditional pastel de nata (egg-custard tart). 
 
Around Tavira, there are also many other local villages well worth exploring.
 
Olhao
Olhão is the largest fishing port in the Algarve. 10km from Faro, Olhao is full of character with Moorish-style houses habited by the local small fishing settlement of a handful of people. Olhão from the fishing port side is, very industrial and doesn't look very attractive. However, along the waterfront,  there is a long, pleasant, paved promenade with pretty gardens that offer a pretty escape to the heat of the summer sun. Olhão is well known for it's fish market and in particular the numerous local cafes  serving the freshly caught wares along the roadside nearby -we guarantee you won't be disappointed!
 
The market halls are surrounded by pavement cafes and it is an unspoilt cultural  place to sit and enjoy the view of the boats moored along the waterfront in Olhão Marina and the gorgeous sand spit beach Ilhas of Armona and Culatra just a short distance offshore behind them.
 
Fuseta
Around 20km east of Faro,  the traditional fishing town of Fuzeta is one of the Algarve’s least “discovered” resorts. It is not the region’s most beautiful town, but it does retain some character as a working fishing port where the daily routine revolves around its fishermen, whose colourful boats line up alongside the river in town whilst they head to the line of lively kiosk-cafés spreading  from the ferry stop towards the river beach.
 
The waterfront of modern shops and apartments faces broad gardens tand a busy summer campsite. Beyond this is the estuary beach and beyond that a beautiful stretch of white sand over the lagoon on the Ilha da Armona. This beach more than makes up for the Industrial - style town as a secret jewel on the unspoilt eastern coast.
 
Santa Luzia
The small octopus fishing village of Santa Luzia, where traditional methods are still used to catch the octopus and freshly cooked to perfection in the harbour front restaurants. Santa Luzia overlooks the lagoons and waterways of the Ria Formosa Natural Park, which is a haven for migratory birds and small marine life.Santa Luzia is a traditional Portuguese fishing village, which remains authentic and untouched by the influences of tourism. The colourful fishing boats return early in the morning and this is the best time to visit the fish market, where the last night’s catch is displayed and sold. On the seaward side of Ria Formosa are some of the quietest beaches of the Algarve and these pristine beaches can be reached by small ferries that depart from the harbour.
 
Santa Luzia also boasts the Praia do Barril beach - which was the setting for the strangest memorial of the Algarve, the Anchor Cemetery, dedicated to the fisherman that lived there.
 
Cabanas de Tavira
Cabanas de Tavira is a former fishing village, about 7km east from Tavira. The history of Cabanas goes back to the year of 1734, at the same time the tuna fish fishing activity started, originating a need for the creation of huts (cabanas is the Portuguese word for huts) to store all the fishing tools and the growth of the community.
 
This parish still lives mainly from fishing, contributing to the enrichment of the local gastronomy with daily, fresh products such as tuna fish, razor clams, oysters etc. Although the strong connection and dependence derives from fishing, Cabanas also appeals to the visiting tourist, where the village sits alongside a long line of low-rise houses, shops, bars and restaurants facing the picturesque Ria Formosa Nature Park.
 
Vila Nova de Cacela:
 
Vila Nova de Cacela is in fact two towns; Cacela Velha - 'old' Cacela - and Vila Nova de Cacela - 'new' Cacela:
 
1. Cacela Velha
Cacela Velha is a quaint Portuguese village located in the civil parish of Vila Nova de Cacela, municipality of Vila Real de Santo António. Cacela Velha is situated on top of a hill with a view to the easternmost lagoon of the Ria Formosa. Cacela Velha was once open to the sea, with the mouth of the Pedra Alva river making a small harbour. During the 7th - 13th centuries, defensive ramparts were built and Cacela Velha was the first point in the Algarve conquered by the knights of the Order  in 1240.
 
For many years, commercial fishing has been the main source of commerce for Cacela Velha, but in recent years, the village has been visited as a picturesque tourist destination. Situated 10km east of Cabanas, the whitewashed village is a reminder of how the Algarve would have looked half a century ago. Apart from a few café-restaurants, there are few tourist facilities, a pretty church and the remains of an eighteenth-century fort that houses a maritime police station. Cacela Velha’s beachfront location and lack of modern overdevelopment is attractive to many visitors, whilst the village's fishing fleets continue to supply the local seafood restaurants with oysters, clams, prawns and baby squid. Golfers will be delighted by the 36 holes of Quinta da Ria and Quinta da Cima golf courses; great golf and beautiful courses with sea views and olive-lined fairways.
 
2. Nova de Cacela
Cacela Velha Vila Nova de Cacela is a small town which has all the basic amenities including a newly built town market. However, the town's one claim to fame is its street market, held on the 3rd Sunday of every month, which fills the entire town and temporarily doubles the population. It is a 26 km trip from Faro airport nestling on the edge of the stunning Serra do Caldeirão mountains where a breathtaking view of the long stretches of golden beaches can be appreciated - Fabrica and Manta Rota beaches are minutes away. The jewel in the crown for this village though is Eastern Algarve's exclusive Monte Rei Golf & Country Club. This golfing paradise features the award-winning Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course, set in a private estate spanning over 1,000 acres of unspoilt countryside with dramatic views of the neighbouring mountains and Atlantic ocean.
 
Manta Rota
Manta Rota is a small seaside town in the civil parish of Vila Nova de Cacela, municipality of Vila Real de Santo António. The town boasts traditional bars, cafes and well-appointed restaurants selling traditional Portuguese plates that will tempt you after a hard day relaxing on the amazing golden sands beach. The beach at Manta Rota sits on the edge of the Ria Formosa Natural Park and is part of the long sweep of fine sand that arches from the frontier town of Vila Real de Santo António, on the Spanish border, to Praia de Cabanas in Tavira. The beach is backed by low sand dunes which seem to go on forever, and it is often said the sea temperature at Manta Rosa is warmer than much of the Algarve. This is partly due to the shallow slope of the beach which not only keeps the water warmer but makes it perfect for paddling - a great family beach with plenty of facilities.It should be noted however, that this beach is very popular in the hot summer months.
 
Altura
Altura is situated 50 minutes away from Faro airport and just 6 miles from the Spanish border. A 20 minute drive from Tavira takes you to the laid-back feel of Altura which is reflected in the way of life here, from the delights of the daily market to the hospitality of the local population. If you are seeking peace and tranquillity in beautiful surroundings Altura is a perfect bustling village location with a wide choice of restaurants, bars and cafes that will leave a lasting impression. The Algarve is big on watersports, and Altura holidays are no exception, with windsurfing, snorkelling, scuba diving, jet-skiing and water-skiing on offer at the local beach.
 
Monte Gordo
Monte Gordo has been transformed from a minor fishing village into a modern and popular resort town. 
 
During the summer months, Monte Gordo has a buzzing atmosphere, attracting a wide selection of nationalities, including many Portuguese, who adore this part of the algarve region. In the town, there is a diverse selection of restaurants catering for every cuisine and taste, while the nightlife is relaxed and social, focused around late-night bars and restaurants. This town is ideal for, families with younger children as the beach this far down the coast is one of the safest of the Algarve, with small waves and no strong currents. Visitors can enjoy a great day on the glorious relaxing beach - although watersports are still available for the more adventurous - followed by a calm but touristic  town atmosphere to top off a perfect day.
 
Vila Real de Santo Antonio
Vila Real de Santo Antonio is a pretty 18th century Portuguese border town where the ferry crosses the Guadiana river from here to Ayamonte, Spain., There is also a modern road bridge just north of the town which allows road transport the easy and main access point to Spain. Vila Real boasts a central grid of streets that radiate out from an orange-grove lined main square, with low white buildings and pleasant outdoor cafés, bars and restaurants. The square is named Praça Marquês de Pombal after the king’s minister, who helped rebuild the original town after it was destroyed in a tsunami following the 1755 earthquake.
 
The town’s former market building is now used as a space for temporary exhibits and films which also dispenses tourist information. The streets surrounding the main square  are bustling with linen shops, clothing, jewelry and local crafts, while the riverside gardens offer fine views of the Marina and across the ocean to the white buildings of the neighbouring village - Ayamonte in Spain.
 
Castro Marim
Castro Marim has, historically, been an important town because of its position near the banks of the Guadiana and its proximity to the coast. The remains of the first settlements in the area date from about 5000 BC and for thousands of years it was a port that offered shelter to the ships that sailed the Guadiana river collecting wares from the Portuguese town Alcoutim.The town has also been important strategic in the defence of the Algarve - during the 14th century the soldiers of the 'Order of Christ,' who replaced the Knights Templar, had their headquarters in Castro Marim. The remains of the castle in Castro Marim, (which dates from 10th to 12th century), stand on one hill overlooking the town and the Fort of São Sebastião on the opposite hill, with the quaint houses of the town in between. From the castle you can get a great view of the river, the salt plains of the formosa and the ocean in the distance.
 
Castro Marim is a town of typically Portuguese houses, wide streets and a lot of the area around is quite flat, making it ideal for bike rides or walks. It appears a very 'laid back' town with no hustle and bustle, just people going about their daily tasks and stopping to take an occasional break at one of the local cafés.The relaxing way of Portuguese life still radiates here today and it is still possible to see some of the traditional crafts such as lace making and basket weaving in this area of the Algarve. There is little tourism here but a familiar sense of Portuguese belonging for passing visitors and new residents that are warmly welcomed into a warm, humble community.
 
Eastern Algarve Golf Courses:
* Benamor Golf Course
* Colina Verde
* Quinta da Ria
* Quinta de Cima
* Monte Rei   (Jack Nicklaus Course)
* Castro Marim
* Quinta do Vale  (Seve Ballesteros Course)

PROPERTY FOR SALE IN THE EAST ALGARVE

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